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Candidate Key
 
 
 
 
 
Summary

This proposed law would prohibit the use of certain traps for fur-bearing mammals, prohibit certain methods of hunting bear or bobcat, and eliminates some restrictions on who may serve on the state Fisheries and Wildlife Board.

The proposed law would prohibit the use, setting, manufacture, or possession of any trap to capture fur-bearing mammals, except common mouse and rat traps, nets, and box or cage traps that confine a whole animal without grasping any part of it. Traps designed to grip an animal's body or body part, crush as steel jaw leghold traps, padded leghold traps, and snares, would be prohibited. Federal and state health officials could use such traps in case of a threat to human health or safety. Where a property owner had reasonably tried but failed to correct an animal problem on the property using a legal trap, the owner could apply for and the state Director of Fisheries and Wildlife could issue a permit to use a prohibited type of trap, except a leghold trap, for up to 30 days to correct the problem.

A person violating any of these requirements could be punished by a fine of between $300 and $1000, or imprisonment for up to 6 months, or both, for each prohibited trap and each day of violation. A person convicted for a second violation would be required to surrender, and could never again obtain, any trapping license or problem animal control permit.

The proposed law would also prohibit the pursuit or hunting of bear or bobcat with the aid of a dog or dogs. Hunting bear using any type of bait, lure, or attraction, or knowingly hunting bear in a baited area, would also be prohibited. The Director could allow the use of dogs or bait in legitimate scientific research projects and in order to control particular animals that posed a threat to human safety or that destroyed livestock, property, or crops.

Violators could be punished by a fine of between $300 and $1000, or imprisonment for up to 6 months, or both, for each violation. A person convicted for a second violation would be required to surrender, and could never again obtain, any hunting and dog training licenses and permits.

The proposed law would eliminate the requirement that five members of the state Fisheries and Wildlife Board have held sporting licenses in the state for five consecutive years and that four members represent fishing, hunting, and trapping interests.

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect.

A YES VOTE would prohibit the use of certain traps for fur-bearing mammals, prohibit certain methods of hunting bear or bobcat and eliminate some restrictions on who may serve on the Fisheries and Wildlife Board.

A NO VOTE would make no change in the trapping or hunting laws, and would retain restrictions on who may serve on the Fisheries and Wildlife Board.

1996 Nov 5 :: State of Massachusetts :: Question 1 :: Initiative PetitionDo you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 1, 1996?

View as: # | %  
Ward
Yes
No
Blank Votes Total Votes Cast Total Ballots Cast
Totals
 
18,370
4,819
3,832
23,189
27,021
Precinct 1
 
546
140
173
686
859
Precinct 2
 
653
212
152
865
1,017
Precinct 3
 
602
168
102
770
872
Precinct 1
 
610
138
209
748
957
Precinct 2
 
936
194
262
1,130
1,392
Precinct 3
 
1,030
216
101
1,246
1,347
Precinct 1
 
897
230
204
1,127
1,331
Precinct 2
 
855
227
174
1,082
1,256
Precinct 3
 
972
273
228
1,245
1,473
Precinct 1
 
626
231
181
857
1,038
Precinct 2
 
765
233
126
998
1,124
Precinct 3
 
696
176
345
872
1,217
Precinct 1
 
859
262
125
1,121
1,246
Precinct 2
 
913
269
148
1,182
1,330
Precinct 3
 
1,000
259
138
1,259
1,397
Precinct 1
 
1,279
325
124
1,604
1,728
Precinct 2
 
1,164
256
209
1,420
1,629
Precinct 3
 
1,030
220
124
1,250
1,374
Precinct 1
 
999
249
287
1,248
1,535
Precinct 2
 
948
264
182
1,212
1,394
Precinct 3
 
990
277
238
1,267
1,505
Totals
 
18,370
4,819
3,832
23,189
27,021